Category Archives: Food Climate & Society seminar series

Land sharing versus land sparing

The Department of Geography in collaboration with the Brighton and Sussex Universities Food Network (BSUFN) and the Sussex Sustainability Research Programme (SSRP) are organising a weekly seminar series on “Food, Climate and Society”. This series will explore the multiple challenges that the global food system is facing: feeding more people healthy food while limiting environmental and social impacts.

The final seminar in this series will be given by Dr Jorn Scharlemann (University of Sussex) on the topic of ‘Land Sharing Versus Land Sparing‘. The seminar will be on Thursday the 28th of April 2016 from 12:30  until 14;00 and will be held in Arts C Global Studies Resource Centre, University of Sussex.

After completing a PhD on eggshell thickness declines at the Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, UK, Jorn Scharlemann worked as a Research Biologist for the RSPB studying the impacts of agriculture on biodiversity. From 2003-2005 he was a post-doc at the Department of Zoology, University of Oxford modelling deer, ticks and tick-borne diseases, followed by a year as a post-doctoral research fellow at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Panama. From 2007-2012 Jorn was the Senior Scientist at UNEP World Conservation Monitoring Centre, Cambridge, UK. In 2012 he moved to the University of Sussex as Reader in Ecology & Conservation. Since 2015 has been the Interim Director of the Sussex Sustainability Research Programme.

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Food and the sustainable healthy diets question

The Department of Geography in collaboration with the Brighton and Sussex Universities Food Network (BSUFN) and the Sussex Sustainability Research Programme (SSRP) are organising a weekly seminar series on “Food, Climate and Society”. This series will explore the multiple challenges that the global food system is facing: feeding more people healthy food while limiting environmental and social impacts.

This week Dr Tara Garnett (Food Climate Research Network, Oxford Martin Programme on the Future of Food, University of Oxford) will be giving a seminar titled ‘Food and the sustainable healthy diets question‘. This seminar will be on Thursday the 21st of April 2016, from 12:30 to 14:00. All seminars take place in Arts C Global Studies Resource Centre, University of Sussex.

Tara Garnett founded the Food Climate Research Network based at the Environmental Change Institute at the University of Oxford. She has done much research on the contribution of food systems to global emissions of greenhouse gases and the consequences of project future food scenarios.

Life in a time of food price volatility

The Department of Geography in collaboration with the Brighton and Sussex Universities Food Network (BSUFN) and the Sussex Sustainability Research Programme (SSRP) are organising a weekly seminar series on “Food, Climate and Society”. This series will explore the multiple challenges that the global food system is facing: feeding more people healthy food while limiting environmental and social impacts.

This week Dr Naomi Hossain (Institute of Development Studies) will be giving a seminar titled ‘Life in a time of food price volatility‘. This seminar will be on Thursday the 14th of April 2016, from 12:30 to 14:00. All seminars take place in Arts C Global Studies Resource Centre, University of Sussex.

Naomi Hossain is a political sociologist with nearly 20 years of development research and advisory experience. Her work focuses on the politics of poverty and public services, and includes research on elite perceptions of poverty, governance and accountability of education and social protection, and women’s empowerment. Naomi has conducted primary research in Afghanistan, Bangladesh and Indonesia, and cross-country research in Latin America, sub-Saharan Africa, and South and Southeast Asia.

What is a sustainable food system?

The Department of Geography in collaboration with the Brighton and Sussex Universities Food Network (BSUFN) and the Sussex Sustainability Research Programme (SSRP) are organising a weekly seminar series on “Food, Climate and Society”. This series will explore the multiple challenges that the global food system is facing: feeding more people healthy food while limiting environmental and social impacts.

The Food, Climate and Society seminar series continues on Thursday the 7th of April 2016 with Professor Tim Benton talking on the topic of “What is a sustainable food system?“.

All Food, Climate and Society seminars are held on Thursday lunchtimes from 12:30 until 14:00 in Arts C Global Studies Resource Centre, University of Sussex.

Tim Benton’s research career has focussed on the linkage between organisms and environmental changes, and on how farming drives ecological dynamics (at field, landscape and larger scales, up to global). He has used a variety of techniques through his career, including field and lab work, statistical, numerical and analytical modelling. He has held positions at UEA (postdoc), Cambridge University Press (Science Editor), Stirling University (lecturer and Senior Lecturer), Aberdeen University (Senior Lecturer) and Leeds (Professor, 2005, Director of the Institute of Integrative and Comparative Biology (2005 -2007), Pro-Dean for Research (2007-2011). Since 2011, he has been UK Champion for Global Food Security, acting as ambassador and spokesperson for matters to do with food and food security, and coordinating work across this area between research councils and government departments.

Novel foods and sustainable consumption

The Department of Geography in collaboration with the Brighton and Sussex Universities Food Network (BSUFN) and the Sussex Sustainability Research Programme (SSRP) are organising a weekly seminar series on “Food, Climate and Society”. This series will explore the multiple challenges that the global food system is facing: feeding more people healthy food while limiting environmental and social impacts.

This week’s seminar will be given by Dominic Glover, Institute for Development Studies. The seminar will be held on Thursday the 10th of March from 12:30 to 14:00 in Arts C, Global Studies Resource Centre, University of Sussex.

Some experts and entrepreneurs think that edible insects could form a significant part of the human diet in the future.  Freeze-dried insects might be cooked and eaten whole or ground up into insect ‘meal’ or ‘flour’ and incorporated, invisibly, into breads, cakes, pies, croquettes and other prepared foods.  This could be a healthy and more sustainable source of protein than conventional meat, which has a big physical and environmental footprint.  Rearing livestock for food takes allocations of land and water for feed production that might be dedicated to food crops instead.  Not only that, but cows also produce greenhouse gases that contribute to global warming, which fuels climate change.  But, meanwhile, meat remains a highly desired status food; as people get richer, they often tend to consume more meat.  Insect-based animal and fish feeds are already on the market, which might reduce the environmental footprint of conventional meat.  But will consumers choose to eat insect-based foods instead?  The answer probably depends not only on ethical and environmental considerations but also basic issues such as cost, flavour and texture.  Also, edible insects are not the only protein alternative under development, so future insect-based foods might have to compete in the market place with other protein alternatives based on algae or fungi, or even synthetic meat.  This lecture will introduce some major issues and discuss a recent foresight project that considered the future of edible insects in the global food system.

Bees, Pesticides and Politics – Prof Dave Goulson seminar

The Department of Geography in collaboration with the Brighton and Sussex Universities Food Network (BSUFN) and the Sussex Sustainability Research Programme (SSRP) are organising a weekly seminar series on “Food, Climate and Society”. This series will explore the multiple challenges that the global food system is facing: feeding more people healthy food while limiting environmental and social impacts.

This week Professor Dave Goulson (University of Sussex) will be giving the seminar, talking on ‘Bees, Pesticides, and Politics’. The seminar will be on Thursday the 25th of February 2016 and will be held in Arts C Global Studies Resource Centre (Sussex campus) from 12:30 to 14:00.

After a childhood chasing butterflies and collecting bird’s eggs, Dave Goulson studied Biology at Oxford University, and then did a PhD on butterfly ecology at Oxford Brookes University. Shortly afterwards he got a lectureship at University of Southampton, where he stayed for 11 years. It was there that he began to specialize in bumblebee ecology and conservation. In 2006 he became Professor of Biology at Stirling University. In 2006 he also founded the Bumblebee Conservation Trust, a charity devoted to reversing bumblebee declines. In 2013 he moved to Sussex University.

Dave has published over 200 scientific articles on the ecology of bees and other insects, and is author of Bumblebees; their behaviour, ecology and conservation (2010, Oxford University Press) and A Sting in the Tale (2013, Jonathan Cape), a popular science book about bumblebees.

He is a Fellow of the Royal Entomological Society, and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. In 2010 he was BBSRC “Social Innovator of the Year” and in 2013 won the Marsh Award for Conservation Biology from the Zoological Society of London.

Water for food: global, regional and domestic virtual trade networks

The Department of Geography in collaboration with the Brighton and Sussex Universities Food Network (BSUFN) and the Sussex Sustainability Research Programme (SSRP) are organising a weekly seminar series on “Food, Climate and Society”. This series will explore the multiple challenges that the global food system is facing: feeding more people healthy food while limiting environmental and social impacts.

This week Dr Carole Dalin (Gratham Research Institute, London Schoool of Economics) will be giving the seminar on the topic of Water for Food: global, regional and domestic virtual trade networks.

Carole Dalin’s research concentrates on the water-food-energy nexus of Southern Africa, and on the socio-economic implications of climate forecasts, regarding natural resources management in particular. She works with Declan Conway, on the SAHEWS project (Southern Africa’s Hydro-Economy and Water Security).

Her doctoral thesis focuses on water resources transfers, through Chinese and international agricultural trade.

The seminar will be held on Thursday the 18th of February from 12:30 until 14:00 in Arts C Global Studies Resource Centre, University of Sussex campus.